After watching on Facebook as my brother and his fiancée made their way through Asia, we thought it would be a great idea to meet up with them in their final destination – Japan. We’d initially had vague plans to travel around the country a little, but in the end they were low on money and Tokyo turned out to be more than enough to keep us occupied for 10 days.

I suppose my first tip is not to confuse Akasaka and Asakusa. My second tip would be to consider a trip to this somewhat under the radar neighbourhood in the evening. There are loads of bars and restaurants around, and it’s walking distance to Roppongi if you want to make a night of it. Here are my top tips:

Hotel Grand Fresa

We booked the Hotel Grand Fresa because the price was so reasonable, and it turned out to be a fantastic base for our trip. It was only a minutes walk from Akasaka station, which was on the very useful C line *~sealion~*, and you could walk to Roppongi in about 20 minutes.

We arrived very early and discovered that we couldn’t check in for about three hours. Not ideal after a long journey, but we decided to use this to our advantage and scope the local area. The receptionists took our bags and we stepped out to experience the city for the first time.

Then the receptionists chased us down the street to lend us an umbrella, so we forgave them for their check in rules. 

When we did manage to check in, we were able to pick and choose from a large selection of toiletries and teas on offer to guests in the reception area. Laden with bath salts, we headed up to our cosy room, which was actually in a different building. Although tiny, the room was well equipped, with a small kitchenette (kettle, sink, microwave), little wardrobe, TV, and JAPANESE BUM-WASHING TOILET!!! Yes, all my dreams had come true. It was wonderful.

Japanese Bum-Washing Toilet!

Time for Shrines

Hie-Jinja

At the end of Akasaka-dori, across Sotobori-dori, we discovered Hie-Jinja by taking an intriguing looking escalator! The instant we reached the top, we found ourselves in an oasis of calm, completely different from the bustling city below. We had a little wander around, watching people praying, and enjoying the peace and quiet, before heading back down to earth. The website has a helpful guide on the etiquette of visiting a shrine.

Hie-Jinja
Hie-Jinja
Hie-Jinja
Hie-Jinja
Hie-Jinja

Nogi-Jinja

Taking Akasaka-dori in the other direction leads you to Nogi-Jinja, a shrine dedicated to Count Nogi Maresuke, a general in the Japanese army who committed ritual suicide on the day of Emperor Meiji’s funeral, in accordance with the samurai tradition of following your master into death. At 8am on a drizzly Sunday morning, this was a peaceful place to while away some time with just the gardeners for company.

Nogi-Jinja
Nogi-Jinja
Nogi-Jinja

Eating and Drinking

Akasaka-dori and the roads around it are full of great looking places to eat and drink. Embarrassingly, we got breakfast from Starbucks on quite a few days, but in my defence, they drew cute little cats on our cups, and the cinnamon buns were gigantic.

Akasaka
Akasaka

On our first evening, we met up with Paul and Jamie at Akasaka metro, before taking a walk along one of the livelier looking roads to find a spot for a drink and a catch-up. We found a bar which had covered its walls with posters of J-Pop stars, and had an inflatable vicar playing guitar outside. We ordered highballs, which are incredibly popular in Japan – you can buy them premixed in supermarkets. I wasn’t a massive fan of the ones made with just whisky and soda, but the flavoured ones were a lot more interesting – ginger was a particular hit.

After drinks, we spent a long time looking for the perfect place to eat, dismissing the many Korean restaurants on offer as it seemed right to eat Japanese food on our first night in Japan. We eventually found a fantastic little Ramen place, where the lady running the joint helped us to work the machine where you selected and paid for your (very reasonable, delicious and enormous) meal. Inside, the restaurant was cosy and felt very down to earth. Although, it seemed that they regularly had famous Japanese guests (and Bruno Mars), as the walls were covered in signed sheets of paper.

Akasaka
Akasaka

Ever been to Japan? Got any tips on where to source a bum-washing toilet in the UK? Leave a comment below