I’ve never seen stations as beautiful as those on the St Petersburg metro. When Vlad visited London, he was a bit disappointed with the tube stations – he was expecting them to be much grander, and after visiting his city, I understand why. The magnificent metro stations of St Petersburg were designed as palaces for the people, and my goodness, the people got some lovely palaces.

You can book organised tours of the metro, and I’m sure you would find out more about the history of the stations that way, but we were happy to just explore on our own. I believe metro tickets cost about 30 roubles for the flat fare; you just pop your token in the barrier and travel as far as you like for as long as you like.

Ploshchad Alexandra Nevskogo I and II

Ploshchad Alexandra Nevskogo mosaic
Ploshchad Alexandra Nevskogo platform
Ploshchad Alexandra Nevskogo bas-relief

Details: 

Ploshchad Alexandra Nevskogo metro station celebrates the life of Alexander Nevsky (saint, prince and military hero). If you’re wondering how on earth Alexander Nevsky has become Alexandra Nevskogo, then welcome to the world of Russian cases, my friend.

Decoration: 

  • A colourful and pleasingly gory mosaic depicting the Russian victory over foreign invaders in the 13th century
  • A wall decorated with gold scales to represent great military generals
  • A bas-relief of five men riding four horses.

Access: 

Metro lines 3 and 4

Ploshchad Vosstaniya

Exterior of Ploshchad Vosstaniya Metro Station
Decoration at Ploshchad Vosstaniya Metro Station

Details: 

Ploshchad Vosstaniya, located in Uprising Square, is dedicated to the 1917 revolution. Here is a picture of someone ignoring Lenin giving a speech.

Decoration: 

  • The station has an interesting exterior, complete with steeple
  • Inside you can find plaques depicting moments of the revolution

Access:

Metro lines 1 and 3

Avtovo

Avtovo Metro Station
Avtovo Metro Station

Details: 

Avtovo station was sadly undergoing some refurbishment when we visited, but can you imagine how grand it must be normally?

Decoration: 

  • Amazing chandeliers hanging on the platform
  • Columns featuring glass manufactured in the Lomonosov factory
  • Mosaic commemorating the Siege of Leningrad during WWII

Access: 

Metro line 1

 

Kirovsky Zavod

Kirovsky Zavod
Kirovsky Zavod
Kirovsky Zavod

Details: 

Kirovsky Zavod is named after a nearby factory, and pays homage to Soviet industrial achievements.

Decoration: 

  • Industrial motifs
  • Big old bust of Lenin

Access:

Metro line 1

Narvskaya

Narvskaya metro, St Petersburg
Narvskaya metro, St Petersburg

Details: 

Narvskaya station was due to be called Stalinskaya, and originally featured a big mural of him at one end of the platform. Upon his death, the name was changed and the mural covered up during the period of de-Stalinisation which followed. You can see the mural here.

Narvskaya is named after the Narva triumphal gate, located nearby.

Decoration: 

  • Hard working Soviet people
  • Hammers and sickles aplenty

Access:

Metro line 1

Frunzenskaya

Frunzenskaya metro station

Details: 

Frunzenskaya is named in honour of Bolshevik leader Mikhail Frunze.

Decoration: 

  • Monument to Frunze and his revolutionary comrades

Access:

Metro line 2

Pushkinskaya

Alexander Pushkin, Pushkinskaya metro

Details: 

Pushkinskaya is named, as you might expect, for Russian literary favourite, Alexander Pushkin.

Decoration: 

  • Memorial of a brooding Alexander Pushkin (which was covered in cut flowers during our visit – as were a lot of memorials in the city).

Access:

Metro lines 1 and 5

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Fantastic tour of the St Petersburg metro system
Fantastic tour of the St Petersburg metro system

As you can see, we only made it round a few of the 67 metro stations in St Petersburg, but it was a lot of fun! If you’d like to give it a go, you can find a good bilingual map here.

Have you got a favourite metro system?